3 Steps To Living a Miraculous Life

You may have read the title of this article and thought, “Man, that sounds groovy—but it’s nothing but a pipe dream.” Many of us long for a life of happiness, balance and peace, but we don’t believe we can have it. But the great paradox is that our lack of faith in love and miracles is what blocks us from receiving love and miracles. Many of us have more faith in fear than we do in love and miracles. If we want to live a miraculous life, we must raise the volume on the loving voice within us and turn down the volume on our fear.

1. Choose Love Over Fear

The first step in choosing love over fear is to understand your fear. As a student of A Course in Miracles I learned to become the witness to my fear-based thoughts. Each time I felt fear set in, I’d take a deep breath, step outside of my thoughts and actions, and witness my behavior. By witnessing my fears I was able to see how delusional they actually were. For instance, early in my career I ran a public relations business. With every new client came a new opportunity to negotiate my monthly retainer. I hated negotiating. It made me feel anxious and jittery, and I’d lose my sense of calm. When I acknowledged my fears around negotiating for more money, I realized it was related to a belief I’d picked up that women shouldn’t ask for more. This was an outside projection the world had created, and I’d chosen to believe it. But when I got honest about my fear, I was able to see how this “lack” mentality had become a fear-based pattern in my mind. When you choose to perceive love over fear, life begins to flow.

2. Be Willing To Let Go of Fear 

Once you’ve gained clarity about your fears, the next step is willingness. A Course in Miracles says that the slightest willingness is all you need to receive the guidance to change. When we become open to let go of our fear, we open our heart, mind and energy to be guided to a new perspective. Willingness raises your consciousness of new possibilities and ignites what I call your ~ing (your inner guide). Your ~ing is the voice of love, your inspiration and your intuition. All you need is a little willingness to get your ~ing on and receive guidance to change.

This guidance will come in different forms: intuition, inspiration, and sometimes even through synchronicities. Often we can experience intuition as a strong inner knowing that offers us guidance of some form. Inspiration can be experienced as a feeling of flow and excitement that comes through in moments when our thoughts and actions are aligned with love. Then there are moments of synchronicity, which are really cool—like when you’re thinking about your mother and she calls or when you keep hearing about a new book and the next day it falls off the shelf in the store.

In my book, May Cause Miracles, I emphasize three other key components to living a miraculous life: gratitude, forgiveness and love. The act of forgiveness is to the miracle worker as lettuce is to the raw foodie.

Forgiveness guides us to cleanse ourselves of the old, junky fear and shines light on the darkness of our worries, doubts and suspicions. Rather than continuing to play the role of victim, we can forgive and be set free. With each choice to forgive, we shift our perception from fear to love.

Forgiveness is like air: we need it to survive.

Then comes gratitude. An emphasis on gratitude is the only attitude for the miracle worker. Living a grateful life creates more abundance, acceptance and appreciation. In order to transform your fears back to love, you must embrace a way of being that puts gratitude first.

3.  Choose Love Everyday

Finally, there is love—the most crucial ingredient. A Course in Miracles teaches that the only thing missing in any situation is love, and where there is fear there is no love. Therefore, living with an open heart and embracing love as our true purpose is essential to living a miraculous life.

Gabrielle Bernstein has been labeled by the New York Times as the next-generation guru. A motivational speaker, life coach, and author, she is expanding the lexicon for the seekers of today and tomorrow.

What Are You Grateful For?

A few years ago, I watched an interview on television with a Vietnam veteran who’d been a fighter pilot. On one mission, he was shot down and captured by the Viet Cong. He was sent to the infamous “Hanoi Hilton” prisoner-of-war camp, where he spent seven years starving and being repeatedly beaten.

When he returned home after the war, this man wrote a book about his experience. He said that he wasn’t bitter about what had happened, because it had taught him the meaning of appreciation. Not a day goes by now when he doesn’t appreciate the fact that he’s holding a cup of coffee and can get a refill if he wants one. Each time he steps into the shower, he’s grateful for being able to freshen up, thankful for the hot water and soap.

As I listened to this man, I realized that I had a very different scale on which I listed the things I appreciate. He made me notice that I’d completely eclipsed the everyday pleasure and ease of my life. Ever since that interview, I’ve looked at everything I do and have, and all the ways life is so easy for me through eyes filled with gratitude.

Where once on my list of gratitude I had only the “biggies”—such as enough money and good health—now I realize that being able to have coffee, water, tea, and any and all kinds of food and clothing is nothing short of a miracle. I have a life full of choices. I’m living in a free country. And each one of these facts has countless other gratitude spin-offs. So when you think about what you’re grateful for, start small and build from there.

Caroline Myss has been in the field of energy medicine and human consciousness for 20 years. She specializes in assisting people in understanding the emotional, psychological, and physical reasons why their bodies have developed an illness.

Why Are You So Worried?

We have so many worries. We worry about money, yet we know that money is only a tool, a means to an end. What we really want is happiness, a bit of security in our lives, some modicum of joy. Happiness, security, and joy are inner states. They are free; money cannot purchase them. Worry is merely a habit—and a negative, unpleasant habit at that. Worry will not change anything, nor will it bring you those things that you really need and desire. And money will not bring you happiness. I have treated many extremely wealthy people in my psychotherapy practice, and many of them have been miserable and unhappy. Money is a neutral thing, neither good nor bad. What you do with money creates its value.

We worry about success and failure, yet we cannot really define these concepts. Is a poor person who is happy and who has wonderful, loving relationships a failure? Is a rich person who has terrible relationships and no love in his life a success? Our cultures have defined success and failure for us, and the definitions have been deficient. So what is the point in worry about success?

We worry too much about what other people think of us—about their opinions, judgments, and criticisms. Yet their opinions are based on the same cultural values as those measuring money and defining success. Once again, we are worrying about nothing.

All other apprehensions fall into the same paradigm. Worrying cannot effect positive change or growth. It will not change the future. Planning for the future is useful, but worrying is not. This is a useless habit, a conditioned response we have acquired from our parents, our teachers, and our communities. Intellectually we all know this, but old habits are difficult to break. If we could only stop worrying so much, how much happier we all would be! We would experience much less stress in our lives.

The irony is that, when observed from a more detached perspective, this type of stress is an illusion. It is not real. We create it ourselves. And we all know this.
Events or perceptions that have the capacity to induce stress reactions in us are subjective and relative. An occurrence that traumatizes you may not affect me at all, or vice versa. An event that caused you considerable stress last year may hardly register this year, because your attitude or perspective may have changed in that period of time. You may even enjoy the experience this time around or perceive it as an exciting challenge rather than a threat, trauma, or stressor. It is quite simply all in the eye of the beholder. Our free will determines our reaction to these events. Will we react with fear, or with confidence and optimism? The choice is ours to make: stress or confidence, fear or love, anxiety or inner peace.

Brian L. Weiss, M.D., is a psychiatrist who lives and practices in Miami, Florida. He’s a graduate of Columbia University and Yale Medical School, and is the former Chairman of Psychiatry at the Mt. Sinai Medical Center in Miami.